Throw away the bathroom scales; pick up a tape measure instead

Throw out the bathroom scales - use a tape measure instead

For years, women have been told that weight gain could lead to heart disease. It’s true there is a link between heart disease and the amount of fat on the body.

A study by The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) indicates it’s the location of the fat that matters most.

Not all fat is the same

Research shows it’s abdominal fat – fat around the middle or what doctors call “central obesity” – is the most dangerous.

“The findings of this study are consistent with what we know about the detrimental effects of central obesity.

Not all fat is the same, and central obesity is particularly dangerous because it is associated with risk for heart disease, the number one killer of women. Identifying women with excess abdominal fat, even with a normal BMI, is important so that lifestyle interventions can be implemented,”

Dr. Stephanie Faubion, NAMS medical director.

So rather than using weight or BMI as a measurement of health, women should be measuring their waistline as an indicator of progress.

“Inches off the waist” are more important for heart health that “pounds off the scales”.


Source: https://journals.lww.com/menopausejournal/Abstract/2019/11000/Association_between_obesity_type_and_obstructive.8.aspx

Photos: Tape measure on scales at Pexles.com


Japanese doctors found seeds from a Southeast Asian tree may improve obesity and diabetes

melinjo tree seeds on tree

Medical researchers have known for a long time that the hormone adiponectin improves obesity and diabetes and that the compound resveratrol increases the production of this beneficial hormone.

Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan who study plants from around the world for useful medicinal properties have found that Melinjo seed extract (MSE) stimulates the production of adiponectin, a beneficial hormone that improves obesity and diabetes. They also discovered that individual genetic differences were responsible for variations in its efficacy.

In Southeast Asia, the fruit, flowers, and leaves of Indonesia’s “Melinjo” tree are traditional foods.

Melinjo tree seeds

The resveratrol compounds in the seeds of Melinjo tree may help with obesity and diabetes.


Source: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-61148-2


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