Traditional vegetable diet reduces risk of premature babies

Eating vegetables before getting pregnant reduces risks of premature birth

It turns out we should follow our parent’s advice when we’re thinking about becoming parents ourselves, with a study finding eating the traditional ‘three-veggies’ before pregnancy lowers the risk of a premature birth.

University of Queensland PhD candidate Dereje Gete analysed the diets of nearly 3500 women and found high consumption of carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, pumpkin, cabbage, green beans and potatoes before conception helped women reach full term pregnancy.

Eating vegetables before conception can reduce the risk of premature birth.

It’s important to start eating vegetables long before conception, for it to have any benefit on the pregnancy.

“Starting a healthier diet after the baby has been conceived may be too late, because babies are fully formed by the end of the first trimester,” he said.


Source: https://medicine.uq.edu.au/article/2020/04/traditional-vegetable-diet-lowers-risk-premature-babies

Photos: Woman holding leaves by Daria Shevtsova at Pexels.com | Pills and thermometer on bed by Polina Tankilevitch at Pexels .com


Eating salmon during pregnancy may reduce risk of asthma in offspring in later life

Cooked salmon with vegetables

The study, led by Professor Philip Calder of the University of Southampton, showed that the benefit of eating salmon while pregnant did not show up until the child was 2 to 3 years old.


Drinking orange juice and tomato juice while pregnant has been shown to improve infant intelligence

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Allergy tests were performed on children at six months and then at two to three years of age. Results were compared to a control group, whose mothers did not eat salmon during pregnancy.

The diet of pregnant mothers has long term effects on their child's health

This study shows how the effects of the mother’s diet, while pregnant, has long term effects on the child’s health.

These benefits may not be immediately obvious at birth or soon after and may only appear later in childhood.

“Our new findings from the Salmon in Pregnancy Study indicate that early nutrition interventions, even during pregnancy, can have long lasting effects on health”

Professor Philip Calder of the University of Southampton

These latest results are one example of Professor Calder’s ground-breaking research into specific relationships between nutrition and immune-related conditions over the course of the human life course.


Fishy diet – in moderation – when pregnant improves the child’s metabolism

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Source: https://www.southampton.ac.uk/news/2016/04/philip-calder-award.page

Photos: Salmon steak on lettuce by Dana Tentis from Pexels.com


Fishy diet – in moderation – when pregnant improves the child’s metabolism

Salmon and cucumber open sandwich

To eat or not to eat fish is a question that has long concerned pregnant women. Now, a new USC study shows that children whose mothers ate fish from one to three times a week during pregnancy were more likely to have a better metabolic profile — despite the risk of exposure to mercury — than children whose mothers ate fish rarely (less than once a week).

“Pregnant women should stick to one to three servings of fish a week as recommended, and not eat more, because of the potential contamination of fish by mercury and other persistent organic pollutants.”

Dr. Leda Chatzi, associate professor of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC

Fish is a major source of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids which are important for the developing fetus.


Eating salmon during pregnancy may reduce risk of asthma in offspring in later life


However, some types, such as swordfish, shark and mackerel, can contain high levels of mercury — a potent toxin that can cause permanent neurological damage. Mercury contamination is also found in soil, air, water and plants.

More fish is not better

The children of women who ate fish from one to three times a week had lower metabolic syndrome scores than the children of women who ate fish less than once a week.

But the benefit declined if women ate fish more than three times a week.


Drinking orange juice and tomato juice while pregnant has been shown to improve infant intelligence


Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200316141507.htm

Photos: Smoked salmon on toast by Lum3n at Pexels.com | Cooked salmon steak on lettuce by Dana Tentis at Pexels.com


Drinking orange juice and tomato juice while pregnant has been shown to improve infant intelligence

Drinking orange juice while pregnant improves babys intelligence

A new study explores in greater depth the effect on infant cognition of drinking fruit juice while pregnant.

Results show that infants whose mothers had their diets supplemented with fruit juice – particularly orange juice and tomato juiceperformed significantly better on tests of memory.

“Our results show that there is significant cognitive benefit for the offspring of mothers that ingest more fruit during pregnancy,” said Rachel Ward-Flanagan, University of Alberta

“We see this as especially valuable information for pregnant mothers, as this offers a nonpharmacological, dietary intervention to boost infant brain development.” said  Claire Scavuzzo, co-lead author of the study and postdoctoral researcher in the Faculty of Science’s Department of Psychology.


Fishy diet – in moderation – when pregnant improves the child’s metabolism

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“The idea that nutrition may also impact mental health and cognition has only recently started to gain traction,” said Ward-Flanagan. “People want to be able give their kids the best possible start in life, and from our findings, it seems that a diet enriched with fruit is a possible way to do so.”


Eating salmon during pregnancy may reduce risk of asthma in offspring in later life

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Source: https://www.ualberta.ca/science/news/2020/february/pregnancy-fruit-brain-development.html

Photos: Glass of Orange Juice by JÉSHOOTS | Pregnant woman in white by Dominika Roseclay


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