Latest Research : People with high cholesterol condition should eliminate carbs, not saturated fats.

burger with fries

For decades, people diagnosed with inherited high cholesterol (familial hypercholesterolemia) have been told avoid saturated fats to lower their blood level cholesterol and reduce their risks of heart disease.

“Eating less saturated fat made no difference for patients with inherited high cholesterol condition.”

“For the past 80 years, people with familial hypercholesterolemia (inherited high cholesterol) have been told to lower their blood level cholesterol with a diet low in saturated fats” said lead author David Diamond, professor and heart disease researcher at the University of South Florida.

Saturated fat has been given a bad name.

It might be the bun and the fries raising your cholesterol, not the burger and cheese!

Doctors have consistently advised patients with inherited high cholesterol to try to lower their cholesterol blood levels, by avoiding foods which contain cholesterol, such as eggs, cheese, meat and coconut oil.

But there is no evidence that avoiding these high cholesterol foods makes any difference to patients with inherited high cholesterol condition.

The eggs, cheese and meat won’t raise your cholesterol levels, but the pizza base might!


“Our study showed that a more ‘heart healthy’ diet is one low in sugar, not saturated fat.”

David Diamond, professor and heart disease researcher at the University of South Florida

Professor Diamond and his co-authors say following a low-carb diet is most effective for people at increased risk of heart disease, such as those who are overweight, hypertensive and diabetic.

Bread, potatoes and sweets are the real dangers, for people with inherited high cholesterol, high blood pressure or diabetes.

Their findings are consistent with another paper recently published in the “Journal of the American College of Cardiology,” which provided strong evidence that food that raises blood sugar, such as bread, potatoes and sweets, should be minimized, rather than tropical oils and animal-based food.


Source: University of South Florida https://www.usf.edu/news/2020/people-with-high-cholesterol-should-eliminate-carbs-not-saturated-fat.aspx

Photos: Bread by ArtHouse Studio at Pexels Pizza by Pablo Macedo at Pexels.com


Self-control does not mean sacrificing pleasure

Happiness is pleasure without the regret

Carrot cake or carrot sticks?

… sometimes it’s a difficult choice.

… sometimes it’s an easy one.

If we are trying to reduce our size and change our shape, choosing the cake may feel like a fialure of self-control.

But not always.

Researchers at City University London have discovered that feeling of having “given in to temptation” doesn’t depend on whether you choose the cake or the vegetable: it depends on if you think you will regret your choice in the future.

If someone, who is weight conscious, ate a slice of carrot cake, they might think they had a “self-control failure” but only because they imagined they would regret that choice later.

But if that same person only ate a small piece of cake, that might not be enough to trigger the future feelings of regret. And therefore they would not see it as a “failure” – they’d just seeing it eating a small piece of nice cake.

Its not lack of self-control if you don't feel bad about it
It’s not lack of self-control if you don’t regret it.

“If a person is comfortable with their weight and does not anticipate to regret in advance their food consumption choices, then we cannot say that person lacks self-control.”

Dr Irene Scopelliti, associate professor of marketing at Cass Business School.

“It is not the consumption of cake that automatically signals a self-control failure, it is whether consumers believe that they may regret their food choice in the future; our research demonstrates that health and pleasure are not necessarily in conflict.”

Dr Irene Scopelliti, associate professor of marketing at Cass Business School.

This plays into the false perception that food is either “good” or “bad, which is an incorrect over-simplification.


Souce: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191029080726.htm

Photos: Happiness is a piece of cake by Antonio Quagliata at Pexels.com


 

Traditional vegetable diet reduces risk of premature babies

Eating vegetables before getting pregnant reduces risks of premature birth

It turns out we should follow our parent’s advice when we’re thinking about becoming parents ourselves, with a study finding eating the traditional ‘three-veggies’ before pregnancy lowers the risk of a premature birth.

University of Queensland PhD candidate Dereje Gete analysed the diets of nearly 3500 women and found high consumption of carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, pumpkin, cabbage, green beans and potatoes before conception helped women reach full term pregnancy.

Eating vegetables before conception can reduce the risk of premature birth.

It’s important to start eating vegetables long before conception, for it to have any benefit on the pregnancy.

“Starting a healthier diet after the baby has been conceived may be too late, because babies are fully formed by the end of the first trimester,” he said.


Source: https://medicine.uq.edu.au/article/2020/04/traditional-vegetable-diet-lowers-risk-premature-babies

Photos: Woman holding leaves by Daria Shevtsova at Pexels.com | Pills and thermometer on bed by Polina Tankilevitch at Pexels .com


Yo-yo dieters’ brains and drug addicts’ brains have similar behaviours

Desperate for another hit?

According to Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) the yo-yo pattern of overeating followed by undereating, reduces the brain’s ability to feel reward.

An estimated 15 million people compulsively eat in the U.S. It is a common feature of obesity and eating disorders, most notably, binge eating disorder. People often overeat because it is pleasurable in the short term, but then attempt to compensate by dieting, reducing calorie intake and limiting themselves to “safe,” less palatable food. However, diets often fail, causing frequent “relapse” to overeating of foods high in fat and sugar (palatable foods).

Desperate for another hit? Or going “cold turkey”?

Yo-Yo dieters’ brains eventually show “drug-addict” like reactions.

“We are just now beginning to understand the addictive-like properties of food and how repeated overconsumption of high sugar — similar to taking drugs — may affect our brains and cause compulsive behaviors,”

Pietro Cottone, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology & experimental therapeutics at BUSM and co-director of the Laboratory of Addictive Disorders.

In the experiment half the people were given a high sugar, chocolate-flavored diet (exciting food) for two days each week. For the remaining days of the week they were given a standard control diet (dull food). Essentially they “yo-yo’ed” between exciting food and dull food.

The other half of the people were given the standard, dull, food all the time.

Yo-yo dieters’ brains became immune to the effects of amphetamines. They needed a “bigger hit” to feel rewarded.

When these people were given amphetamines, (yes, the researchers gave them all drugs – under medical supervision of course!) the amphimines did not have as much effect on the yo-yo dieters as it did on the people who ate the standard, dull diet.

Researchers found that the yo-yo dieters’ brains behaved similar to drugs addicts’, specifically a “crash” in the reward system.

When people become used to eating highly rewarding, sweet foods, when they can no longer get those rewarding foods, they have a similar “downer” to drug addicts who are going cold turkey.

Drug addicts eventually become immune to the “reward feelings” caused by the drug, which leads to drug addicts needing a bigger and bigger “high” every time. Similarly yo-yo dieting, leads to a constant search for a “bigger high” with more rewarding food, after a period of dull, unrewarding standard food.

“Compulsive eating may derive from the reduced ability to feel reward. These findings also provide support to the theory that compulsive eating has similarities to drug addiction.”

The researchers hope these findings spark new avenues of research into compulsive eating that will lead to more effective treatments for obesity and eating disorders.


Source: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191017125240.htm

Photo: Hand reaching for donut by Tijana Drndarski at Pexels.com


Dutch scientists find that kids are twice as likely to eat healthier after watching cooking shows with healthy food and healthy portion sizes

Healthy TV cookery shows leads to healthy food choices by younger viewers

This lockdown might be benefiting children’s eating habits if they watch healthy cooking on TV.

Just as Joe Wick’s virtual PE lessons have got the nations kids jumping around their living rooms, and improving their health, healthy cooking TV shows can be a key ingredient in nudging children towards healthier food choices now and into adulthood.

In other news: People who compulsively check their phones,
tend to be fatter than people who don’t

Read more …

Researchers asked children to watch 10 minutes of a television cooking program designed for children, and then offered them a snack as a reward for participating. Children who watched the healthy program were far more likely to choose one of the healthy snack options — an apple or a few pieces of cucumber — than one of the unhealthy options — a handful of chips or a handful of salted mini-pretzels.

“The findings from this study indicate cooking programs can be a promising tool for promoting positive changes in children’s food-related preferences, attitudes, and behaviors.”

Frans Folkvord, PhD, of Tilburg University,Tilburg, Netherlands.
Watching healthy TV cookery shows leads to healthy food choices by younger viewers

Watching healthy TV cookery shows leads to healthy food choices by younger viewers

Visual prominence of healthier options in both food choice and portion size on TV cooking programs leads young viewers to want healthier options.

It also makes them freely choose those healthier options too.

So watching TV can be good for you!


Source: https://www.elsevier.com/about/press-releases/research-and-journals/kids-twice-as-likely-to-eat-healthy-after-watching-cooking-shows-with-healthy-food

Photos: Children slicing vegetables by Gustavo Fring at Pexels.com | Baby chef eating yellow pepper at Pexels.com


When does clean eating become an unhealthy obsession?

When healthy eating becomes an obsession it can become unhealthy
When healthy eating becomes an obsession it can become unhealthy

Although eating healthy is an important part of a healthy lifestyle, for some people this preoccupation with healthy eating can become physically and socially impairing.

When it becomes a pathological obsession with healthy eating or consuming only a limited range of food it is known as known as orthorexia nervosa 

 healthcare providers as well as members of the public should recognise … that so-called healthy eating can, in fact, be unhealthy. It can lead to malnourishment or make it very difficult to socialize with people in settings that involve eating. It can also be expensive and time-consuming.”

Jennifer Mills, associate professor in the Department of Psychology and senior author on the study

“When taken to the extreme, an obsession with clean eating can be a sign that the person is struggling to manage their mental health.”

Previous research has shown that unlike individuals with anorexia nervosa who restrict calories to maintain very low body weight, people who have the condition have a fixation with the quality of food eaten and its preparation rather than the number of calories.

Over time, people with orthorexia nervosa  spend increasing amounts of time and effort purchasing, planning, and preparing pure and healthy meals.

Eventually this planning and obsessing becomes all-consuming that interferes with other areas of life and results in weight loss.

Other eating habits such as being a vegetarian or vegan also put individuals at higher risk for developing orthorexia nervosa. Lacto-vegetarians were at highest risk for developing orthorexia nervosa and people who are on a strict eating schedule, spending large amounts of time preparing meals, were also at greater risk.

“In our research, we found equal rates of men and women who struggle with symptoms of orthorexia nervosa,” said Mills. “We still think of eating disorders as being a problem that affects mostly young women. Because of that assumption, the symptoms and negative consequences of orthorexia nervosa can fly under the radar and not be noticed or taken seriously.”

In short, it’s good to be careful about what you eat.
But also take care about being too careful!


Source: Materials provided by York UniversityNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

Photos: Woman slicing vegetables by Retha Ferguson at Pexels.com


Proof: “device addiction” is making us fatter

Device addiction is making us fatter

New research from Rice University indicates that mindless switching between digital devices is associated with increased susceptibility to food temptations and lack of self-control, which may result in weight gain.

“Increased exposure to phones, tablets and other portable devices has been one of the most significant changes to our environments in the past few decades, and this occurred during a period in which obesity rates also climbed in many places,” said Richard Lopez, a postdoctoral research fellow at Rice and the study’s lead author.

People who compulsively check their phones,
tend to be fatter than people who don’t

The research found that people who used their phone compulsively or inappropriately (such as wanting check their phone for messages while they were talking to someone else) as well as more passive behaviors (like media-related distractions that interfere with your work) found that they had a with higher body mass index (BMI) and greater percentage of body fat.

When media multitaskers/compulsive phone users were shown pictures of food, whilst they were in a fMRI brain scanner, researchers saw increased activity in the part of the brain dealing with food temptation.

Compulsive phone user’s brains react
differently to images of tempting foods

Overall, Lopez said these findings suggest there are links between media multitasking, risk for obesity, brain-based measures for self-control and exposure to real-world food cues.


In other news: It’s not just WHAT you eat but also WHEN you eat

Read more …

“Such links are important to establish, given rising obesity rates and the prevalence of multimedia use in much of the modern world,” he said of the findings.

Lopez and his fellow researchers hope the study will raise awareness of the issue and promote future work on the topic.

The study was co-authored by Todd Heatherton of Dartmouth College and Dylan Wagner of Ohio State University.

“This study supports our research at MindfullyTrim” says Matt Walker-Wilson, lead researcher at MindfullyTrim, who did not contribute to the study.

“Automatic behaviour – or automaticity – is often the quickest and easier, but not always the best for our health.

Being mindful about what we are doing – being mindful about our eating and also being mindful about other activities – can lead to better choices and a healthier lifestyle.”


Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11682-019-00056-0

Photo: People using devices by fauxels at Pexels.com


 

Eating salmon during pregnancy may reduce risk of asthma in offspring in later life

Cooked salmon with vegetables

The study, led by Professor Philip Calder of the University of Southampton, showed that the benefit of eating salmon while pregnant did not show up until the child was 2 to 3 years old.


Drinking orange juice and tomato juice while pregnant has been shown to improve infant intelligence

Read more …

Allergy tests were performed on children at six months and then at two to three years of age. Results were compared to a control group, whose mothers did not eat salmon during pregnancy.

The diet of pregnant mothers has long term effects on their child's health

This study shows how the effects of the mother’s diet, while pregnant, has long term effects on the child’s health.

These benefits may not be immediately obvious at birth or soon after and may only appear later in childhood.

“Our new findings from the Salmon in Pregnancy Study indicate that early nutrition interventions, even during pregnancy, can have long lasting effects on health”

Professor Philip Calder of the University of Southampton

These latest results are one example of Professor Calder’s ground-breaking research into specific relationships between nutrition and immune-related conditions over the course of the human life course.


Fishy diet – in moderation – when pregnant improves the child’s metabolism

read more …

Source: https://www.southampton.ac.uk/news/2016/04/philip-calder-award.page

Photos: Salmon steak on lettuce by Dana Tentis from Pexels.com


An apple a day might help keep bothersome menopause symptoms away

New study finds that higher intakes of certain fruits and vegetables may lessen menopause symptoms, but some actually increase menopausal symptoms.

The consumption of fruits or a Mediterranean-style diet, characterized by a high content of vegetables, fruits, cereals, and nuts, was linked to fewer menopause symptoms and complaints.

However, some fruits and vegetables were shown to have an adverse effect, according to a study published in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

Specifically, citrus fruits seem to increase menopausal symptoms. Also dark green leafy vegetables and yellow vegetable were shown to worsen menopause symptoms.

Hot flashes impair memory performance

Read more …


Citrus fruits make menopausal symptoms worse.

Dark green leafy veggies and dark yellow vegetables are not good for menopause symptoms.


Source: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/02/200219124232.htm

Photos: Citrus fruits by Anna Tukhfatullina Food Photographer/Stylist at Pexels.com |
Cabbage by freestocks.org at Pexels | Lilac apple on yellow by The Lazy Artist Gallery from Pexels.com


Fishy diet – in moderation – when pregnant improves the child’s metabolism

Salmon and cucumber open sandwich

To eat or not to eat fish is a question that has long concerned pregnant women. Now, a new USC study shows that children whose mothers ate fish from one to three times a week during pregnancy were more likely to have a better metabolic profile — despite the risk of exposure to mercury — than children whose mothers ate fish rarely (less than once a week).

“Pregnant women should stick to one to three servings of fish a week as recommended, and not eat more, because of the potential contamination of fish by mercury and other persistent organic pollutants.”

Dr. Leda Chatzi, associate professor of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC

Fish is a major source of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids which are important for the developing fetus.


Eating salmon during pregnancy may reduce risk of asthma in offspring in later life


However, some types, such as swordfish, shark and mackerel, can contain high levels of mercury — a potent toxin that can cause permanent neurological damage. Mercury contamination is also found in soil, air, water and plants.

More fish is not better

The children of women who ate fish from one to three times a week had lower metabolic syndrome scores than the children of women who ate fish less than once a week.

But the benefit declined if women ate fish more than three times a week.


Drinking orange juice and tomato juice while pregnant has been shown to improve infant intelligence


Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200316141507.htm

Photos: Smoked salmon on toast by Lum3n at Pexels.com | Cooked salmon steak on lettuce by Dana Tentis at Pexels.com


It’s not just WHAT you eat but also WHEN you eat

What you eat and when you eat it make a difference

A recent study by Vanderbilt University, USA shows that it’s not just how many calories you eat, but WHEN you eat them that will determine how well you burn those calories.

We have all heard that “breakfast is the most important meal of the day”.

It turns out, this is more important than we imagined, for weight management!

Your daily biological clock and sleep regulate how the food you eat is metabolized.

Your body either burns stored fats or burns carbohydrates, and that choice depends on the time of day or night.

Your body’s circadian rhythm has programmed your body to burn fat when you sleep, so when you skip breakfast and then snack at night you delay burning the fat.


In other news: People who compulsively check their phones, tend to be fatter than those who don’t

Read more …

The experiments showed that a late-evening snack flipped a switch on fat/carbohydrate preference.

The late-evening snack session resulted in less fat burned when compared to the breakfast session.

Essentially, calories eaten at breakfast are used as fuel throughout the day.

Calories eaten later in the evening replenish the body’s fat stores.

If you want to avoid replenishing those fat stores – if you want those fat stores to be burned up as you sleep – avoid eating in the evening.

The longer your fast between your last evening meal and your first meal the next day – your break fast – the more of that stored fat is used up.


Calories consumed at breakfast time are burned as fuel throughout the day.

Breakfast - the most important meal of the day

Calories consumed in the evening are stored as fat.

Eating later in the day, means those calories are probably stored as fat

This study has important implications for eating habits, suggesting that a daily, and extended, fast between the evening meal and breakfast will optimize fat loss.


Source: https://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.3000622

Photos: Loaded breakfast table by Pixabay | Woman with red wine by Elina Sazonova | Breakfast bowl and spoon by Burst


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